Coal Industry Recovers as Biden Heads to UN Climate Summit

Posted by on October 25, 2021 3:04 am
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Categories: NATIONAL HEADLINES

Biden and his administration will fly to Scotland next week for the United Nation’s climate summit, a yearly summit held within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change since 1995.

This comes as the coal industry, which the Democrats have worked hard to destroy, is making a comeback. Then presidential candidate Hillary Clinton even said in 2016 that they’re “going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.”

Liberl NPR radio even reported on the rise of the coal industry:

More than 40 percent of America’s coal comes from the Powder River Basin, a 120-mile swath along the Montana-Wyoming border.

But times have been tough for producers there. Like other U.S. coal-producing areas, the Powder River Basin has seen mine closures and job losses mount in recent years. Production hit a 50-year low in 2020, and 151 coal mines were idled or closed.

“It’s been year after year where we’ve seen decline, decline, decline,” says Joe Micheletti, an executive with Westmoreland Mining, which operates three mines in Montana. “Our hope is maybe we’ve hit the bottom,” he says, “and what we see coming is maybe … that the coal demand is going to be maybe steady.”

The Energy Information Administration keeps track of energy production in the United States. Their October report said the following:

We expect 22 percent more U.S. coal-fired generation in 2021 than in 2020, according to our latest Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). The U.S. electric power sector has been generating more electricity from coal-fired power plants this year as a result of significantly higher natural gas prices and relatively stable coal prices. This year, 2021, will yield the first year-over-year increase in coal generation in the United States since 2014.

Still, the EIA predicts a rather grim future for the coal industry, mostly because “the electric power sector has retired about 30% of its generating capacity at coal plants since 2010, and no new coal-fired capacity has come online in the United States since 2013.”

Still, Biden and company will attempt to accelerate the collapse of the coal industry by aritfical, beaucratic means. There could be a natural way that coal becomes obselete as solar and other technologies replace the dying industry, but the Biden agenda is eager to destory the lives of working class Americans.